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dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, A
dc.contributor.authorLink, K
dc.contributor.authorHaughtigan, K
dc.contributor.authorBeer, OWJ
dc.contributor.authorPowell, L
dc.contributor.authorRoyse, D
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-23T12:44:58Z
dc.date.available2023-02-23T12:44:58Z
dc.date.issued2024-01
dc.identifier.issn1554-8732
dc.identifier.issn1554-8740
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/20491
dc.description.abstract

Studies have shown that stress has contributed to employee turnover and retention problems for agencies, and at the individual level, chronic stress has been associated with coronary heart disease, anxiety, depression, and many other negative effects. In the past, the extent of stress one has felt has been measured by subjective paper-and-pencil instruments; however, recent technological advances have improved our ability to obtain accurate biofeedback assessments from wearable instruments. The Kentucky Child Welfare Workforce Wellness Initiative is the first known study to explore physiological stress in a sample (n = 32) of child welfare professionals using biometric technology (Firstbeat Bodyguard 2) and the first to report that data longitudinally over a four-month period. The study revealed that a variable associated with the strength of the Autonomic Nervous System (RMSSD) remained below the norms for a healthy population as participants experienced consistent and prolonged physiological stress. When examined relatively to the agency’s lifting of COVID restrictions and returning to face-to-face service delivery, stress levels began to further rise almost to significant levels (p < .10) and the participants’ ability to achieve a state of physiological relaxation significantly decreased. Future research employing biometric technology is also suggested.

dc.format.extent158-181
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherInforma UK Limited
dc.subjectChild welfare
dc.subjectlongitudinal
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjectbiomarkers
dc.subjectjob stress
dc.titlePhysiological evidence of escalating stress during COVID-19: a longitudinal assessment of child welfare workers
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.webofscience.com/api/gateway?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000936269000001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=11bb513d99f797142bcfeffcc58ea008
plymouth.issue1
plymouth.volume18
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15548732.2023.2182396
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalJournal of Public Child Welfare
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15548732.2023.2182396
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Health Professions
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.identifier.eissn1554-8740
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/15548732.2023.2182396
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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