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dc.contributor.authorBridger, D
dc.contributor.authorAttrill, MJ
dc.contributor.authorDavies, BFR
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, LA
dc.contributor.authorCartwright, A
dc.contributor.authorRees, SE
dc.contributor.authorCabre, LM
dc.contributor.authorSheehan, EV
dc.date.accessioned2022-12-12T10:54:32Z
dc.date.available2022-12-12T10:54:32Z
dc.date.issued2022-12-09
dc.identifier.issn2693-8847
dc.identifier.issn2693-8847
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/20062
dc.description.abstract

The United Kingdom's first large-scale, offshore, long-line mussel farm deployed its first ropes in 2013 in Lyme Bay, southwest United Kingdom, located in an area of seabed that was heavily degraded due to historic bottom-towed fishing. It was hypothesised that due to the artificial structures that accumulate mussels and exclude destructive fishing practices, the seabed could be restored. To assess the restoration potential of the farm and its ecosystem interactions over time, a multi-method, annual monitoring approach was undertaken. Here, we tested the effects of the farm trial stations on the seabed habitat, epifauna and demersal species over 5 years. Responses of % mussel cover, sessile and sedentary, and mobile taxa were measured using three video methods. Within 2 years of infrastructure deployment, mussel clumps and shells were detected below the headlines, increasing the structural complexity of the seabed. After 4 years, there was a significantly greater abundance of mobile taxa compared to the Controls that remained open to trawling. Commercial European lobster and edible crab were almost exclusively recorded within the farm. We discuss whether these findings can be considered a restoration of the seabed and how these data can be used to inform the future management of offshore mariculture globally.

dc.format.extent437-449
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectaquaculture
dc.subjectartificial infrastructure
dc.subjectbenthic macrofauna
dc.subjectblue growth
dc.subjectecology
dc.subjectepibenthos
dc.subjectmariculture
dc.subjectMytilus edulis
dc.subjectpolicy
dc.titleThe restoration potential of offshore mussel farming on degraded seabed habitat
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeReview
plymouth.issue6
plymouth.volume2
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aff2.77
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalAquaculture, Fish and Fisheries
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/aff2.77
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/PRIMaRE Publications
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA14 Geography and Environmental Studies
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-09-07
dc.rights.embargodate2022-12-13
dc.identifier.eissn2693-8847
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1002/aff2.77
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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