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dc.contributor.authorStamp, T
dc.contributor.authorWest, E
dc.contributor.authorColclough, S
dc.contributor.authorPlenty, S
dc.contributor.authorCiotti, B
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, T
dc.contributor.authorSheehan, E
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-28T17:53:09Z
dc.date.available2022-11-28T17:53:09Z
dc.date.issued2022-11-05
dc.identifier.issn0969-997X
dc.identifier.issn1365-2400
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/20026
dc.description.abstract

Saltmarsh provides essential fish feeding and nursery habitat but has globally declined by 50%. We used a statistical block design to compare fish feeding activity within human-engineered or “re-aligned” saltmarsh to established saltmarsh. Linear and multivariate modelling highlighted that Thinlip Mullet (Chelon ramada) and European Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) feeding rates were 16% and 31% lower within re-aligned than established saltmarshes, whereas Gobies (Pomatoschistus spp.) fed at the same rate as in both habitats. Analysis of European bass and Goby gut contents highlighted that important detritivorous prey species were up to 85.6% lower in re-aligned sites. Lower vegetation density may have negatively affected the feeding ecologies of fishes within re-aligned sites. However, due to the ecological value and potential for further improvement or habitat development, continued assessment of the beneficial effects of re-aligned sites for fisheries and net gain perspectives is needed.

dc.format.extent44-55
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectessential fish habitat
dc.subjecthabitat restoration
dc.subjectnet gain
dc.subjectnursery
dc.subjectRe-aligned habitat
dc.subjectsaltmarsh
dc.titleSuitability of compensatory saltmarsh habitat for feeding and diet of multiple estuarine fish species
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.webofscience.com/api/gateway?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000879082000001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=11bb513d99f797142bcfeffcc58ea008
plymouth.issue1
plymouth.volume30
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/fme.12599
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalFisheries Management and Ecology
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/fme.12599
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/PRIMaRE Publications
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-10-10
dc.rights.embargodate2022-12-9
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2400
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/fme.12599
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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