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dc.contributor.authorBertotti, M
dc.contributor.authorHayes, D
dc.contributor.authorBerry, V
dc.contributor.authorJarvis-Beesley, P
dc.contributor.authorHusk, K
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-06T09:04:36Z
dc.date.available2022-10-06T09:04:36Z
dc.date.issued2022-10-04
dc.identifier.issn2352-4642
dc.identifier.issn2352-4650
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/19675
dc.description.abstract

Mental ill health in children and young people (ie, people aged 10–19 years) is a global problem. In 2019, one in seven children and young people had diagnosed mental health conditions. The drivers for this high burden are complex and include home-based and school-based risks, lifestyle factors, and vulnerabilities due to disability, discrimination, and socioeconomic circumstances. There is no quick fix, but one holistic approach with potential is social prescribing. Social prescribing is gaining recognition globally, with significant policy and research traction in England , where it is now included as an all-age service in the 2019 NHS Long Term Plan. The original adult model requires primary care practitioners to refer an individual to a link worker, who supports them to connect and participate in community-based activities, primarily delivered by the non-profit sector.

dc.format.extent835-837
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectPrimary Health Care
dc.subjectPractice Patterns, Physicians'
dc.titleSocial prescribing for children and young people
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeJOUR
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352464222002486
plymouth.issue12
plymouth.volume6
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s2352-4642(22)00248-6
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalThe Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S2352-4642(22)00248-6
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/Peninsula Medical School
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA20 Social Work and Social Policy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/FoH - Community and Primary Care
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Plymouth Institute of Health and Care Research (PIHR)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Researchers in ResearchFish submission
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-08-18
dc.rights.embargodate2023-4-4
dc.identifier.eissn2352-4650
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/S2352-4642(22)00248-6
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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