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dc.contributor.authorKhan, FR
dc.contributor.authorCatarino, AI
dc.contributor.authorClark, NJ
dc.contributor.editorCourtene-Jones W
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-30T11:35:54Z
dc.date.issued2022-08-16
dc.identifier.issn2397-8554
dc.identifier.issn2397-8562
dc.identifier.otherETLS20220014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/19663
dc.description.abstract

Microplastics (MPs, <5 mm in size) are a grave environmental concern. They are a ubiquitous persistent pollutant group that has reached into all parts of the environment — from the highest mountain tops to the depths of the ocean. During their production, plastics have added to them numerous chemicals in the form of plasticizers, colorants, fillers and stabilizers, some of which have known toxicity to biota. When released into the environments, MPs are also likely to encounter chemical contaminants, including hydrophobic organic contaminants, trace metals and pharmaceuticals, which can sorb to plastic surfaces. Additionally, MPs have been shown to be ingested by a wide range of organisms and it is this combination of ingestion and chemical association that gives weight to the notion that MPs may impact the bioavailability and toxicity of both endogenous and exogenous co-contaminants. In this mini-review, we set the recent literature within what has been previously published about MPs as chemical carriers to biota, with particular focus on aquatic invertebrates and fish. We then present a critical viewpoint on the validity of laboratory-to-field extrapolations in this area. Lastly, we highlight the expanding ‘microplastic universe’ with the addition of anthropogenic particles that have gained recent attention, namely, tire wear particles, nanoplastics and, bio-based or biodegradable MPs, and highlight the need for future research in their potential roles as vehicles of co-contaminant transfer.

dc.format.extent339-348
dc.format.mediumPrint
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPortland Press Ltd.
dc.subjectadditives
dc.subjectbioaccessability
dc.subjectbioavailability
dc.subjectchemical pollutants
dc.subjectplastic pollution
dc.subjectvector effect
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectMicroplastics
dc.subjectPlastics
dc.subjectAquatic Organisms
dc.subjectWater Pollutants, Chemical
dc.subjectEcotoxicology
dc.titleThe ecotoxicological consequences of microplastics and co-contaminants in aquatic organisms: a mini-review
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeReview
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35972188
plymouth.issue4
plymouth.volume6
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1042/etls20220014
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalEmerging Topics in Life Sciences
dc.identifier.doi10.1042/etls20220014
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Health Professions
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-07-29
dc.rights.embargodate2022-10-6
dc.identifier.eissn2397-8562
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1042/etls20220014
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2022-08-16
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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