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dc.contributor.authorScott, R
dc.contributor.authorJoshi, LT
dc.contributor.authorMcGinn, C
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-07T14:00:37Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-28
dc.identifier.issn2053-3713
dc.identifier.issn2053-3713
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/19204
dc.description.abstract

Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) technologies have emerged as a promising alternative to biocides as a means of surface disinfection in hospitals and other healthcare settings. This paper reviews the methods used by researchers and clinicians in deploying and evaluating the efficacy of UVGI technology. The type of UVGI technology used, the clinical setting where the device was deployed, and the methods of environmental testing that the researchers followed are investigated. The findings suggest that clinical UVGI deployments have been growing steadily since 2010 and have increased dramatically since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Hardware platforms and operating procedures vary considerably between studies. Most studies measure efficacy of the technology based on the objective measurement of bacterial bioburden reduction; however, studies conducted over longer durations have examined the impact of UVGI on the reduction of healthcare associated infections (HCAIs). Future trends include increased automation and the use of UVGI technologies that are safer for use around people. Although existing evidence seems to support the efficacy of UVGI as a tool capable of reducing HCAIs, more research is needed to measure the magnitude of these effects and to establish recommended best practices.

dc.format.extent25-33
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollection
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherInstitution of Engineering and Technology (IET)
dc.subject4203 Health Services and Systems
dc.subject40 Engineering
dc.subject42 Health Sciences
dc.subject4003 Biomedical Engineering
dc.subject46 Information and Computing Sciences
dc.subject4601 Applied Computing
dc.subjectBioengineering
dc.titleHospital surface disinfection using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation technology: A review
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeReview
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35662749
plymouth.issue3
plymouth.volume9
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalHealthcare Technology Letters
dc.identifier.doi10.1049/htl2.12032
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Biomedical Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA01 Clinical Medicine
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-05-05
dc.rights.embargodate2022-6-2
dc.identifier.eissn2053-3713
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1049/htl2.12032
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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