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dc.contributor.authorGhosh, S
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, LW
dc.contributor.authorReid, PC
dc.contributor.authorReuman, D
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-25T13:54:55Z
dc.date.issued2020-12
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/18857
dc.description.abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Standard methods for studying the association between two ecologically important variables provide only a small slice of the information content of the association, but statistical approaches are available that provide comprehensive information. In particular, available approaches can reveal <jats:italic>tail associations</jats:italic>, that is, accentuated or reduced associations between the more extreme values of variables. We here study the nature and causes of tail associations between phenological or population‐density variables of co‐located species, and their ecological importance. We employ a simple method of measuring tail associations which we call the <jats:italic>partial Spearman correlation</jats:italic>. Using multidecadal, multi‐species spatiotemporal datasets on aphid first flights and marine phytoplankton population densities, we assess the potential for tail association to illuminate two major topics of study in community ecology: the stability or instability of aggregate community measures such as total community biomass and its relationship with the synchronous or compensatory dynamics of the community's constituent species; and the potential for fluctuations and trends in species phenology to result in trophic mismatches. We find that positively associated fluctuations in the population densities of co‐located species commonly show asymmetric tail associations; that is, it is common for two species’ densities to be more correlated when large than when small, or vice versa. Ordinary measures of association such as correlation do not take this asymmetry into account. Likewise, positively associated fluctuations in the phenology of co‐located species also commonly show asymmetric tail associations. We provide evidence that tail associations between two or more species’ population‐density or phenology time series can be inherited from mutual tail associations of these quantities with an environmental driver. We argue that our understanding of community dynamics and stability, and of phenologies of interacting species, can be meaningfully improved in future work by taking into account tail associations.</jats:p>

dc.format.extent12764-12776
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollection
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley Open Access
dc.subjectaphids
dc.subjectcopula
dc.subjectinterspecies synchrony
dc.subjectmatch&#8211
dc.subjectmismatch hypothesis
dc.subjectplankton
dc.subjecttail association
dc.titleA new approach to interspecific synchrony in population ecology using tail association
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33304492
plymouth.issue23
plymouth.volume10
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.6732
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalEcology and Evolution
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.6732
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-08-04
dc.rights.embargodate2022-2-26
dc.identifier.eissn2045-7758
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1002/ece3.6732
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-12
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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