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dc.contributor.authorAdojoh, O
dc.contributor.authorMarret-Davies, F
dc.contributor.authorDuller, R
dc.contributor.authorOsterloff, P
dc.contributor.authorOboh-Ikuenobe, F
dc.contributor.authorHart, M
dc.contributor.authorSmart, C
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-15T12:14:46Z
dc.date.available2022-02-15T12:14:46Z
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.identifier.issn2666-0334
dc.identifier.issn2666-0334
dc.identifier.other100003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/18779
dc.description.abstract

The Late Quaternary marine sediments from the Niger Delta lacks an age model using conventional radiocarbon dating due to the rarity of calcareous macrofossils. The proprietary nature of material drilled by companies prospecting for hydrocarbons in the Niger Delta basin, and in the rare cases when samples are available for study as well as freshwater dilution from continental runoff have contributed to this dearth of knowledge. The availability of three shallow marine (∼3 m) gravity cores obtained from the eastern, central, and western parts of the Niger Delta provides the opportunity for biostratigraphy utilising well-preserved marker species of planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils in the sediments. The last occurrence (LO) of planktonic foraminiferal species Globorotalia truncatulinoides (late Pleistocene) (MIS 2) and the first occurrence (FO) of Globorotalia tumida (Holocene) (MIS 1) are used to identify two interval zones in the gravity cores. The presence of the calcareous nannofossil Gephyrocapsa oceanica (all <3 μm in size) supports a late Pleistocene age (NN19 Zone) for the lower interval. In addition, an increase in the abundance of Emiliania huxleyi up-section is an indication of early Holocene age (NN20-NN21) for the upper interval.

dc.format.extent100003-100003
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.subjectBiostratigraphy
dc.subjectLate pleistocene
dc.subjectHolocene
dc.subjectPlanktonic foraminifera
dc.subjectCalcareous nannofossils
dc.titleThe biostratigraphy of the offshore Niger delta during the Late Quaternary: Complexities and progress of dating techniques
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.volume1
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalQuaternary Science Advances
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.qsa.2020.100003
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-01-15
dc.rights.embargodate2022-2-16
dc.identifier.eissn2666-0334
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.qsa.2020.100003
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-05
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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