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dc.contributor.authorLaundon, D
dc.contributor.authorMock, T
dc.contributor.authorWheeler, G
dc.contributor.authorCunliffe, M
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-08T15:41:26Z
dc.date.issued2021-07
dc.identifier.issn1751-7362
dc.identifier.issn1751-7370
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/18715
dc.description.abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>The impact of selective predation of weaker individuals on the general health of prey populations is well-established in animal ecology. Analogous processes have not been considered at microbial scales despite the ubiquity of microbe-microbe interactions, such as parasitism. Here we present insights into the biotic interactions between a widespread marine thraustochytrid and a diatom from the ecologically important genus Chaetoceros. Physiological experiments show the thraustochytrid targets senescent diatom cells in a similar way to selective animal predation on weaker prey individuals. This physiology-selective targeting of ‘unhealthy’ cells appears to improve the overall health (i.e., increased photosynthetic quantum yield) of the diatom population without impacting density, providing support for ‘healthy herd’ dynamics in a protist–protist interaction, a phenomenon typically associated with animal predators and their prey. Thus, our study suggests caution against the assumption that protist–protist parasitism is always detrimental to the host population and highlights the complexity of microbial interactions.</jats:p>

dc.format.extent2163-2166
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectEcology
dc.subjectEukaryota
dc.subjectFood Chain
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectPhytoplankton
dc.subjectPopulation Dynamics
dc.subjectPredatory Behavior
dc.subjectSymbiosis
dc.titleHealthy herds in the phytoplankton: the benefit of selective parasitism
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33664434
plymouth.issue7
plymouth.volume15
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41396-021-00936-8
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalThe ISME Journal
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41396-021-00936-8
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-02-10
dc.rights.embargodate2022-2-10
dc.identifier.eissn1751-7370
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41396-021-00936-8
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-07
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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