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dc.contributor.authorInkster, A
dc.contributor.authorMilton, F
dc.contributor.authorEdmunds, CER
dc.contributor.authorBenattayallah, A
dc.contributor.authorWills, A
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-16T09:39:47Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-26
dc.identifier.issn1065-9471
dc.identifier.issn1097-0193
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/18369
dc.description.abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>The inverse base rate effect (IBRE) is a nonrational behavioral phenomenon in predictive learning. Canonically, participants learn that the AB stimulus compound leads to one outcome and that AC leads to another outcome, with AB being presented three times as often as AC. When subsequently presented with BC, the outcome associated with AC is preferentially selected, in opposition to the underlying base rates of the outcomes. The current leading explanation is based on error‐driven learning. A key component of this account is prediction error, a concept previously linked to a number of brain areas including the anterior cingulate, the striatum, and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. The present work is the first fMRI study to directly examine the IBRE. Activations were noted in brain areas linked to prediction error, including the caudate body, the anterior cingulate, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Analyzing the difference in activations for singular key stimuli (B and C), as well as frequency matched controls, supports the predictions made by the error‐driven learning account.</jats:p>

dc.format.extent1370-1380
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley Open Access
dc.subjectcognitive neuroscience
dc.subjectfMRI
dc.subjecthuman learning
dc.subjectinverse base rate effect
dc.subjectprediction error
dc.titleNeural correlates of the inverse base-rate effect
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/34826165
plymouth.issue4
plymouth.volume43
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25729
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalHuman Brain Mapping
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hbm.25729
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Admin Group - REF
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Admin Group - REF/REF Admin Group - FoH
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-11-15
dc.rights.embargodate2021-12-14
dc.identifier.eissn1097-0193
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1002/hbm.25729
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-11-26
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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