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dc.contributor.authorMaslin, Ken
dc.contributor.authorBillson, HAen
dc.contributor.authorDean, CRen
dc.contributor.authorAbayomi, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-13T12:46:30Z
dc.date.issued2021-06-08en
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/18047
dc.description.abstract

<jats:p>Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG) is a condition at the extreme end of the pregnancy sickness spectrum, which can cause poor oral intake, malnutrition, dehydration and weight loss. The aim of this study is to explore the role of Registered Dietitians (RD) in the management of HG in the United Kingdom (UK). A survey was designed and distributed electronically to members of the British Dietetic Association. There were 45 respondents, 76% (n = 34) worked in secondary care hospitals, 11% (n = 5) were in maternal health specialist roles. The most commonly used referral criteria was the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (40%, n = 18), followed by second admission (36%, n = 16). However 36% (n = 16) reported no specific referral criteria. About 87% (n = 37) of respondents did not have specific clinical guidelines to follow. Oral nutrition supplements were used by 73% (n = 33) either ‘sometimes’ or ‘most of the time’. Enteral and parenteral nutrition were less commonly used. There was an inconsistent use of referral criteria to dietetic services and a lack of specific clinical guidelines and patient resources. Further training for all clinicians and earlier recognition of malnutrition, alongside investment in the role of dietitians were recommended to improve the nutritional care of those with HG.</jats:p>

en
dc.format.extent1964 - 1964en
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.titleThe Contribution of Registered Dietitians in the Management of Hyperemesis Gravidarum in the United Kingdomen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue6en
plymouth.volume13en
plymouth.journalNutrientsen
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu13061964en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Nursing and Midwifery
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-06-03en
dc.rights.embargodate2021-10-14en
dc.identifier.eissn2072-6643en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3390/nu13061964en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-06-08en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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