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dc.contributor.authorDone, EJ
dc.contributor.authorKnowler, H
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-08T12:27:51Z
dc.date.issued2021-12
dc.identifier.issn0952-3383
dc.identifier.issn1467-8578
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/18013
dc.description.abstract

<jats:p>A small‐scale study investigated the role of SENCos in England immediately prior to, during and following the first closure of schools nationally in March 2020 due to the Covid‐19 pandemic. A mixed‐methods research strategy comprising semi‐structured interviews and a national online survey generated data related to SENCos' involvement in strategic planning for crisis conditions, focusing specifically on students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and concerns about exclusionary practices. Findings suggest that pandemic conditions have exacerbated familiar issues related to the SENCo role and SEND provision in English schools, such as engagement in reactive firefighting, onerous workloads, uneven SENCo involvement in strategic planning, and schools' failure to prioritise students with SEND. Minimal evidence of ‘advocacy leadership’ or of SENCos challenging exclusionary practices was found. As in earlier research, evidence was also found for disparities between anecdotal and published data relating to illegal exclusion.</jats:p>

dc.format.extent438-454
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectSENCos
dc.subjectstrategic crisis planning
dc.subjectschool exclusion
dc.subjectoff-rolling
dc.titleExclusion and the strategic leadership role of Special Educational Needs Coordinators (SENCos) in England: planning for COVID-19 and future crises
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.issue4
plymouth.volume48
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8578.12388
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalBritish Journal of Special Education
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1467-8578.12388
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business/Plymouth Institute of Education
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA23 Education
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-10-08
dc.rights.embargodate2023-11-16
dc.identifier.eissn1467-8578
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/1467-8578.12388
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-11-16
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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