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dc.contributor.authorTuck, MEen
dc.contributor.authorFord, MRen
dc.contributor.authorKench, PSen
dc.contributor.authorMasselink, Gen
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-28T10:08:26Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-09en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.other5523en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17961
dc.description.abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Large uncertainty surrounds the future physical stability of low-lying coral reef islands due to a limited understanding of the geomorphic response of islands to changing environmental conditions. Physical and numerical modelling efforts have improved understanding of the modes and styles of island change in response to increasing wave and water level conditions. However, the impact of sediment supply on island morphodynamics has not been addressed and remains poorly understood. Here we present evidence from the first physical modelling experiments to explore the effect of storm-derived sediment supply on the geomorphic response of islands to changes in sea level and energetic wave conditions. Results demonstrate that a sediment supply has a substantial influence on island adjustments in response to sea-level rise, promoting the increase of the elevation of the island while dampening island migration and subaerial volume reduction. The implications of sediment supply are significant as it improves the potential of islands to offset the impacts of future flood events, increasing the future physical persistence of reef islands. Results emphasize the urgent need to incorporate the physical response of islands to both physical and ecological processes in future flood risk models.</jats:p>

en
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature)en
dc.titleSediment supply dampens the erosive effects of sea-level rise on reef islandsen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue1en
plymouth.volume11en
plymouth.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-021-85076-xen
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Researchers in ResearchFish submission
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-02-22en
dc.rights.embargodate2021-09-29en
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41598-021-85076-xen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-03-09en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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