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dc.contributor.authorAgom, DAen
dc.contributor.authorOnyeka, TCen
dc.contributor.authorOminyi, Jen
dc.contributor.authorSixsmith, Jen
dc.contributor.authorNeill, Sen
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Sen
dc.contributor.authorPoole, Hen
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-20T09:45:06Z
dc.date.available2021-09-20T09:45:06Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-01en
dc.identifier.issn2158-2440en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17835
dc.description.abstract

<jats:p> Most clinicians receive little or no palliative care (PC) education. Similarly, patients and their families receive little or no information on PC. Our study explored education in PC, while examining for its impacts on service delivery and utilization from the perspective of health care professionals (HCPs), patients, and their families. An ethnographic approach was utilized to gather data from 41 participants. Spradley’s ethnographic analytical framework guided data analysis. Two themes identified were inadequate HCPs’ knowledge base and impact of service-users’ inadequate health education. The findings show that most HCPs had no formal education in PC, attributed to the lack of PC residency programs and the absence of educational institutions that provide such education. Patients and families also conveyed poor understandings of their illness and palliation, rooted in the HCP culture of partial disclosure of information about their diagnosis, care, and prognosis. Findings suggest a cultural shift that supports PC education for professionals is required to promote realist medical approach in the care for patients with life-limiting illnesses. </jats:p>

en
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications (UK and US)en
dc.titleAn Ethnographic Study of Palliative and End-of-Life Care in a Nigerian Hospital: Impact of Education on Care Provision and Utilizationen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue3en
plymouth.volume10en
plymouth.journalSage Openen
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/2158244020938700en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Nursing and Midwifery
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-06-10en
dc.rights.embargodate2021-09-22en
dc.identifier.eissn2158-2440en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/2158244020938700en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-07-01en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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