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dc.contributor.authorMay, Jen
dc.contributor.authorRhodes, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-10T12:29:19Z
dc.identifier.issn1557-251Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17783
dc.description.abstract

Motor imagery when coupled by motivational and cognitive factors have been shown to enhance multiple aspects for sports performance. This paper reviews existing imagery approaches, and proposes a method based on applied applications, intended to increase short and long-term motivation. Behavioural change is achieved by primarily using Motivational Interviewing (MI), then Functional Imagery Training (FIT), which has been adapted into the Applied Imagery for Motivation (AIM) model. AIM starts with an initial interview using MI, then has three imagery phases: macro imagery (beliefs, values and purposeful long-term goal), meso imagery (mentally contrasting between current and future self to evoke change), and micro imagery (planning for immediate action). We explain the use of these three stages which allow athletes to link everyday cues with imagery activation and immediate implementation action plans. We provide practitioners with a comprehensive applied guide to using AIM for performance, merging theory-driven established cognitive and motivational imagery approaches into structured practise.

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.titleApplied Imagery for Motivation: A Person-centred Modelen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.journalInternational Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychologyen
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience/UoA04 REF peer reviewers
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Behaviour
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-09-09en
dc.rights.embargodate9999-12-31
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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