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dc.contributor.authorJones, Sen
dc.contributor.authorChudleigh, Men
dc.contributor.authorBaines, Ren
dc.contributor.authorJones, RBen
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-31T11:37:29Z
dc.date.issued2021-01en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17750
dc.description.abstract

Many educators argue for the benefits of nursing students engaging with social media but some have concerns about inappropriate use. In 2014, we introduced Digital Professionalism, a mandatory curriculum innovation including assessed Twitter use, for nursing but not midwifery students. British nursing students who display unprofessional behaviour are subject to 'Fitness to Practise' hearings. We aimed to use routinely collected data to see if inappropriate social media use had increased from introducing Twitter to the curriculum. We used data (2008-2019) on Fitness to Practise cases for nine completing cohorts comprising 4398 nursing and 338 midwifery students. We compared annual Fitness to Practise incidence rates related to social media between cohorts with and without mandatory Twitter. There was no difference in the number of nursing students involved with social media cases before (7/2636 (0.3%)), and after (10/1762 (0.6%)) the introduction of Twitter. Nursing students, after introduction of Twitter, were no more likely than midwifery students (no introduction of Twitter), to misuse social media. Fitness to Practise hearings related to social media were highly infrequent. Our study supports the argument that benefits for most nursing students of introducing professional use of social media are not negated by increased inappropriate use.

en
dc.format.extent102950 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectFitness to practiseen
dc.subjectNursing and midwiferyen
dc.subjectSocial mediaen
dc.subjectUndergraduate studentsen
dc.subjectCurriculumen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectIncidenceen
dc.subjectProfessionalismen
dc.subjectSocial Mediaen
dc.subjectStudents, Nursingen
dc.titleDid introducing Twitter and digital professionalism as an assessed element of the nursing curriculum impact social media related incidence of 'Fitness to Practise': 12-year case review.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33310508en
plymouth.volume50en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalNurse Educ Practen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nepr.2020.102950en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Nursing and Midwifery
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeScotlanden
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-12-03en
dc.rights.embargodate9999-12-31en
dc.identifier.eissn1873-5223en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.nepr.2020.102950en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-01en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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