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dc.contributor.authorYue, Yen
dc.contributor.authorNi, Jen
dc.contributor.authorCiais, Pen
dc.contributor.authorPiao, Sen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ten
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Men
dc.contributor.authorBorthwick, AGLen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ten
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yen
dc.contributor.authorChappell, Aen
dc.contributor.authorVan Oost, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-22T17:32:30Z
dc.date.available2021-08-22T17:32:30Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-14en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17721
dc.description.abstract

Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y(-1) of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y(-1), equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the "hotspots," largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

en
dc.format.extent6617 - 6622en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectland−atmosphere CO2 fluxen
dc.subjectnational scaleen
dc.subjectsoil carbon displacementen
dc.subjectwater erosionen
dc.titleLateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27247397en
plymouth.issue24en
plymouth.volume113en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalProc Natl Acad Sci U S Aen
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1523358113en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen
dc.identifier.eissn1091-6490en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1073/pnas.1523358113en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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