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dc.contributor.authorWiggett, AJen
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Men
dc.contributor.authorTipper, SPen
dc.contributor.authorDowning, PEen
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-20T17:15:04Z
dc.date.available2021-08-20T17:15:04Z
dc.date.issued2011-06en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17637
dc.description.abstract

Observation of another person executing an action primes the same action in the observer's motor system. Recent evidence has shown that these priming effects are flexible, where training of new associations, such as making a foot response when viewing a moving hand, can reduce standard action priming effects (Gillmeister, Catmur, Liepelt, Brass, & Heyes, 2008). Previously, these effects were obtained after explicit learning tasks in which the trained action was cued by the content of a visual stimulus. Here we report similar learning processes in an implicit task in which the participant's action is self-selected, and subsequent visual effects are determined by the nature of that action. Importantly, we show that these learning processes are specific to associations between actions and viewed body parts, in that incompatible spatial training did not influence body part or spatial priming effects. Our results are consistent with models of visuomotor learning that place particular emphasis on the repeated experience of watching oneself perform an action.

en
dc.format.extent87 - 96en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectImitative Behavioren
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectPsychomotor Performanceen
dc.subjectReaction Timeen
dc.subjectTransfer, Psychologyen
dc.subjectVisual Perceptionen
dc.titleLearning associations between action and perception: effects of incompatible training on body part and spatial priming.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21481998en
plymouth.issue1en
plymouth.volume76en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalBrain Cognen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bandc.2011.02.014en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen
dcterms.dateAccepted2011-02-22en
dc.identifier.eissn1090-2147en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.bandc.2011.02.014en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2011-06en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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