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dc.contributor.authorHudson, M
dc.contributor.authorNicholson, T
dc.contributor.authorKharko, A
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, R
dc.contributor.authorBach, P
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-20T16:37:30Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-23
dc.identifier.issn1069-9384
dc.identifier.issn1531-5320
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17626
dc.description.abstract

Social difficulties in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may originate from a reduced top-down modulation of sensory information that prevents the spontaneous attribution of intentions to observed behaviour. However, although people with autism are able to explicitly reason about others' mental states, the effect of abstract intention information on perceptual processes has remained untested. ASD participants (n = 23) and a neurotypical (NT) control group (n = 23) observed a hand either reaching for an object or withdrawing from it. Prior to action onset, the participant either instructed the actor to "Take it" or "Leave it", or heard the actor state "I'll take it" or "I'll leave it", which provided an explicit intention that was equally likely to be congruent or incongruent with the subsequent action. The hand disappeared before completion of the action, and participants reported the last seen position of the tip of the index finger by touching the screen. NT participants exhibited a predictive bias in response to action direction (reaches perceived nearer the object, withdrawals perceived farther away), and in response to prior knowledge of the actor's intentions (nearer the object after "Take it", farther away after "Leave it"). However, ASD participants exhibited a predictive perceptual bias only in response to the explicit intentions, but not in response to the motion of the action itself. Perception in ASD is not immune from top-down modulation. However, the information must be explicitly presented independently from the stimulus itself, and not inferred from cues inherent in the stimulus.

dc.format.extent1556-1566
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag
dc.subjectAutism spectrum disorder
dc.subjectAction prediction
dc.subjectPredictive coding
dc.subjectImplicit
dc.subjectexplicit mentalizing
dc.subjectRepresentational momentum
dc.titlePredictive action perception from explicit intention information in autism
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/34027620
plymouth.issue5
plymouth.volume28
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13423-021-01941-w
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalPsychonomic Bulletin and Review
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/s13423-021-01941-w
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business/Plymouth Institute of Education
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA23 Education
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-05-01
dc.rights.embargodate2022-5-23
dc.identifier.eissn1531-5320
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3758/s13423-021-01941-w
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-05-23
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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