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dc.contributor.authorNummenmaa, Len
dc.contributor.authorLukkarinen, Len
dc.contributor.authorSun, Len
dc.contributor.authorPutkinen, Ven
dc.contributor.authorSeppälä, Ken
dc.contributor.authorKarjalainen, Ten
dc.contributor.authorKarlsson, HKen
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Men
dc.contributor.authorVenetjoki, Nen
dc.contributor.authorSalomaa, Men
dc.contributor.authorRautio, Pen
dc.contributor.authorHirvonen, Jen
dc.contributor.authorLauerma, Hen
dc.contributor.authorTiihonen, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-20T16:36:07Z
dc.date.available2021-08-20T16:36:07Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-29en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17625
dc.description.abstract

Psychopathy is characterized by persistent antisocial behavior, impaired empathy, and egotistical traits. These traits vary also in normally functioning individuals. Here, we tested whether such antisocial personalities are associated with similar structural and neural alterations as those observed in criminal psychopathy. Subjects were 100 non-convicted well-functioning individuals, 19 violent male offenders, and 19 matched controls. Subjects underwent T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and viewed movie clips with varying violent content during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Psychopathic traits were evaluated with Levenson Self-Report Psychopathy Scale (controls) and Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (offenders). Psychopathic offenders had lower gray matter density (GMD) in orbitofrontal cortex and anterior insula. In the community sample, affective psychopathy traits were associated with lower GMD in the same areas. Viewing violence increased brain activity in periaqueductal grey matter, thalamus, somatosensory, premotor, and temporal cortices. Psychopathic offenders had increased responses to violence in thalamus and orbitofrontal, insular, and cingulate cortices. In the community sample, impulsivity-related psychopathy traits were positively associated with violence-elicited responses in similar areas. We conclude that brain characteristics underlying psychopathic spectrum in violent psychopathy are related to those observed in well-functioning individuals with asocial personality features.

en
dc.format.extent4104 - 4114en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectVBMen
dc.subjectempathyen
dc.subjectfMRIen
dc.subjectpsychopathyen
dc.subjectviolenceen
dc.titleBrain Basis of Psychopathy in Criminal Offenders and General Population.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33834203en
plymouth.issue9en
plymouth.volume31en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalCereb Cortexen
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/cercor/bhab072en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-03-06en
dc.rights.embargodate9999-12-31en
dc.identifier.eissn1460-2199en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/cercor/bhab072en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-07-29en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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