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dc.contributor.authorWinks, Len
dc.contributor.authorWarwick, Pen
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-05T13:07:05Z
dc.date.available2021-08-05T13:07:05Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-01en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17394
dc.description.abstract

Enabling educators to meet new and challenging times requires fundamental shifts to ways of imagining and enacting their practice. A central yet often understated aspect of this educational change are the various ways in which educators receive training and development. From initial teacher training through to continuing professional development, cultures which underpin policy change in educational institutions emerge from the practices of educators. In this paper we examine educators’ experiences of a Wild Pedagogies gathering which took place over three days in central Devon in late spring 2019. Part workshop, part informal social gathering and mutual exchange, this continuing professional development event enabled conversations, sharing (and shaping) of practice, and imagination of the future of personal and institutional educational priorities. This paper positions itself as an account of a gathering of wild pedagogues – captured as reflection, discussion and activities – and brings the participants’ reflections into conversation with wider themes emerging from previous Wild Pedagogies gatherings. It makes the assertion that such dialogic continuing professional development, constructed on foundations of relational and place-responsive pedagogies, can underpin future practitioner development in the event of a policy shift toward greater availability of outdoor learning and nature connection in the UK. The paper ends with four principles for infusing new or existing environmental education continuing professional development with place-responsive and wild pedagogical approaches.

en
dc.format.extent372 - 386en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.title‘From lone-sailor to fleet’: Supporting educators through Wild Pedagogiesen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue3en
plymouth.volume19en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalPolicy Futures in Educationen
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1478210320985706en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business/Plymouth Institute of Education
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA23 Education
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.identifier.eissn1478-2103en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/1478210320985706en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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