Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPieńkowski, AJen
dc.contributor.authorHusum, Ken
dc.contributor.authorBelt, STen
dc.contributor.authorNinnemann, Uen
dc.contributor.authorKöseoğlu, Den
dc.contributor.authorDivine, DVen
dc.contributor.authorSmik, Len
dc.contributor.authorKnies, Jen
dc.contributor.authorHogan, Ken
dc.contributor.authorNoormets, Ren
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-13T12:32:28Z
dc.date.issued2021-12en
dc.identifier.other124en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17349
dc.descriptionNo embargo required.en
dc.description.abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>The cryospheric response to climatic warming responsible for recent Arctic sea ice decline can be elucidated using marine geological archives which offer an important long-term perspective. The Holocene Thermal Maximum, between 10 and 6 thousand years ago, provides an opportunity to investigate sea ice during a warmer-than-present interval. Here we use organic biomarkers and benthic foraminiferal stable isotope data from two sediment cores in the northernmost Barents Sea (&gt;80 °N) to reconstruct seasonal sea ice between 11.7 and 9.1 thousand years ago. We identify the continued persistence of sea-ice biomarkers which suggest spring sea ice concentrations as high as 55%. During the same period, high foraminiferal oxygen stable isotopes and elevated phytoplankton biomarker concentrations indicate the influence of warm Atlantic-derived bottom water and peak biological productivity, respectively. We conclude that seasonal sea ice persisted in the northern Barents Sea during the Holocene Thermal Maximum, despite warmer-than-present conditions and Atlantic Water inflow.</jats:p>

en
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen
dc.titleSeasonal sea ice persisted through the Holocene Thermal Maximum at 80°Nen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue1en
plymouth.volume2en
plymouth.journalCommunications Earth & Environmenten
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s43247-021-00191-xen
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-05-18en
dc.rights.embargodate2021-07-14en
dc.identifier.eissn2662-4435en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s43247-021-00191-xen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-12en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
@mire NV