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dc.contributor.authorKinney, MOen
dc.contributor.authorChester, Ven
dc.contributor.authorTromans, Sen
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, RTen
dc.contributor.authorAngus-Leppan, Hen
dc.contributor.authorBagary, Men
dc.contributor.authorCock, Hen
dc.contributor.authorDevapriam, Jen
dc.contributor.authorHassiotis, Aen
dc.contributor.authorMula, Men
dc.contributor.authorReuber, Men
dc.contributor.authorRing, Hen
dc.contributor.authorRoy, Aen
dc.contributor.authorScheepers, Men
dc.contributor.authorShankar, Ren
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-22T19:12:03Z
dc.date.issued2020-10en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17176
dc.description.abstract

PURPOSE: People with Intellectual Disability (ID) and epilepsy are more likely to experience psychiatric conditions, challenging behaviour (CB), treatment resistance and adverse effects of anti-seizure medications (ASM) than those without. This population receives care from various professionals, depending on local care pathways. This study evaluates the training status, confidence, reported assessment and management practices of different professional groups involved in caring for people with ID, epilepsy and CB. METHODS: A cross sectional survey using a questionnaire developed by expert consensus which measured self-reported training status, confidence, and approaches to assessment and management of CB in people with ID and epilepsy was distributed to practitioners involved in epilepsy and/or ID. RESULTS: Of the 83 respondents, the majority had either a psychiatry/ID (n = 39), or Neurology/epileptology background (n = 31). Psychiatry/ID and Neurology/epileptology had similar confidence in assessing CB in ID-epilepsy cases, but Psychiatry/ID exhibited higher self-rated confidence in the management of these cases. While assessing and managing CB, Psychiatry/ID appeared more likely to consider mental health aspects, while Neurology/epileptology typically focused on ASM. CONCLUSION: Psychiatry/ID and Neurology/epileptology professionals had varying training levels in epilepsy, ID and CB, had differing confidence levels in managing this patient population, and considered different factors when approaching assessment and management. As such, training opportunities in ID should be offered to neurology professionals, and vice versa. Based on the findings, a best practice checklist is presented, which aims to provide clinicians with a structured framework to consider causal explanations for CB in this population.

en
dc.format.extent111 - 116en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectAnti-seizure medicationen
dc.subjectLearning disabilityen
dc.subjectepilepsyen
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subjectEpilepsyen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectIntellectual Disabilityen
dc.subjectNeurologyen
dc.subjectPsychiatryen
dc.titleEpilepsy, anti-seizure medication, intellectual disability and challenging behaviour - Everyone's business, no one's priority.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32777744en
plymouth.volume81en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalSeizureen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.seizure.2020.07.018en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-07-20en
dc.rights.embargodate9999-12-31en
dc.identifier.eissn1532-2688en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.seizure.2020.07.018en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-10en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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