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dc.contributor.authorRees, Aen
dc.contributor.authorSheehan, EVen
dc.contributor.authorAttrill, MJen
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-17T15:42:52Z
dc.date.available2021-02-17T15:42:52Z
dc.date.issued2021-12en
dc.identifier.other3784en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/16892
dc.descriptionNo embargo required.en
dc.description.abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>The ecosystem effects of all commercial fishing methods need to be fully understood in order to manage our marine environments more effectively. The impacts associated with the most damaging mobile fishing methods are well documented leading to such methods being removed from some partially protected areas. In contrast, the impacts on the ecosystem from static fishing methods, such as pot fishing, are less well understood. Despite commercial pot fishing increasing within the UK, there are very few long term studies (&gt; 1 year) that consider the effects of commercial pot fishing on temperate marine ecosystems. Here we present the results from a controlled field experiment where areas of temperate reef were exposed to a pot fishing density gradient over 4 years within a Marine Protected Area (MPA), simulating scenarios both above and below current levels of pot fishing effort. After 4 years we demonstrate for the first time negative effects associated with high levels of pot fishing effort both on reef building epibiota and commercially targeted species, contrary to existing evidence. Based on this new evidence we quantify a threshold for sustainable pot fishing demonstrating a significant step towards developing well-managed pot fisheries within partially protected temperate MPAs.</jats:p>

en
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen
dc.titleOptimal fishing effort benefits fisheries and conservationen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue1en
plymouth.volume11en
plymouth.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-021-82847-4en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/PRIMaRE Publications
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Professional Services staff
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-01-25en
dc.rights.embargodate2021-03-19en
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41598-021-82847-4en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-12en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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