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dc.contributor.authorCladi, L
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-03T16:05:10Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-27
dc.identifier.issn1740-3898
dc.identifier.issn1740-3898
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/16841
dc.description.abstract

Advancing the literature on status in world politics, this article argues that Brexit generated status insecurity for the UK. In order to deal with the consequences of the shock represented by Brexit, the UK sought to address status insecurity in two ways. Firstly, it pursued more modes of engagement with European security simultaneously. It continued to play a leadership role in NATO, and it deepened bilateral cooperation with individual European countries. Secondly, it also articulated its willingness to be treated differently to any other third party by advancing ‘Global Britain’ as a framework for post-Brexit foreign policy, opening up space for involvement in EU defence initiatives. Nevertheless, this article argues that the UK faces the challenge of having to work more for less in the short term, without recognition by the EU of a status beyond third party for the UK. The implications of this are discussed.

dc.format.extent919-936
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan (part of Springer Nature)
dc.subjectBrexit
dc.subjectStatus insecurity
dc.subjectUK
dc.subjectForeign policy
dc.titleDoing more for less? Status insecurity and the UK's contribution to European security after Brexit
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.webofscience.com/api/gateway?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000622658800002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=11bb513d99f797142bcfeffcc58ea008
plymouth.issue6
plymouth.volume58
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1057/s41311-021-00292-6
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalInternational Politics: a journal of transnational issues and global problems
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/s41311-021-00292-6
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA20 Social Work and Social Policy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-02-03
dc.rights.embargodate2022-2-27
dc.identifier.eissn1740-3898
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1057/s41311-021-00292-6
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-02-27
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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