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dc.contributor.authorBernardes Delgado, Men
dc.contributor.authorLatour, Jen
dc.contributor.authorNeilens, Hen
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Sen
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-06T11:29:32Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-04en
dc.identifier.issn1522-2179en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/16785
dc.description.abstract

Oral symptoms in a growing number of palliative care patients are often neglected. Dental professionals are not always involved in palliative care. Oral care is often inadequately delivered to palliative care patients while oral problems can affect quality of life. A qualitative study was conducted to explore oral care experiences of palliative care patients, their relatives and healthcare professionals (HCPs). Four patients, four relatives and four HCPs were interviewed in a hospice. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis and revealed three themes. Patients who were capable of performing oral care mainly brushed their teeth and looked after their dentures. Other care tended to be carried out by relatives and HCPs; adapted based on a person’s level of consciousness. When describing effects on oral health, relatives and HCPs tended to focus on xerostomia, whereas patients provided detailed accounts denoting the psychological and social impact of oral symptoms. Perceptions of enablers and barriers to oral care differed between groups. Patients reported lack of access to professional dental care and patients' fatigue was the main barrier to oral care. Nevertheless, there is great scope for further research into good oral care practices identified in this study and possible implementation in other settings.

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.subjectPalliative Careen
dc.subjectOral Careen
dc.subjectOral Healthen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectFamilyen
dc.subjecthealthcare professionalsen
dc.titleOral care experiences of palliative care patients, their relatives and healthcare professionals: A qualitative studyen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.journalJournal of Hospice and Palliative Nursingen
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/NJH.0000000000000745en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/Peninsula Medical School
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Nursing and Midwifery
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Professional Services staff
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-01-05en
dc.rights.embargodate2022-03-04en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1097/NJH.0000000000000745en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-03-04en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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