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dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Jen
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Ren
dc.contributor.authorCobbold, CAen
dc.contributor.authorBurgess, Ken
dc.contributor.authorMable, BKen
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-15T08:06:16Z
dc.date.available2020-09-15T08:06:16Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-20en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/16267
dc.description.abstract

Selfing plant lineages are surprisingly widespread and successful in a broad range of environments, despite showing reduced genetic diversity, which is predicted to reduce their long-term evolutionary potential. However, appropriate short-term plastic responses to new environmental conditions might not require high levels of standing genetic variation. In this study, we tested whether mating system variation among populations, and associated changes in genetic variability, affected short-term responses to environmental challenges. We compared relative fitness and metabolome profiles of naturally outbreeding (genetically diverse) and inbreeding (genetically depauperate) populations of a perennial plant, Arabidopsis lyrata, under constant growth chamber conditions and an outdoor common garden environment outside its native range. We found no effect of inbreeding on survival, flowering phenology or short-term physiological responses. Specifically, naturally occurring inbreeding had no significant effects on the plasticity of metabolome profiles, using either multivariate approaches or analysis of variation in individual metabolites, with inbreeding populations showing similar physiological responses to outbreeding populations over time in both growing environments. We conclude that low genetic diversity in naturally inbred populations may not always compromise fitness or short-term physiological capacity to respond to environmental change, which could help to explain the global success of selfing mating strategies.

en
dc.format.extent20192109 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectArabidopsis lyrataen
dc.subjectgenetic variationen
dc.subjectinbreedingen
dc.subjectmetabolomicsen
dc.subjectplasticityen
dc.subjectselfingen
dc.subjectArabidopsisen
dc.subjectEnvironmenten
dc.subjectGenetic Fitnessen
dc.subjectGenetic Variationen
dc.subjectInbreedingen
dc.subjectLife History Traitsen
dc.subjectMetabolomeen
dc.subjectPlant Dispersalen
dc.subjectPollinationen
dc.titleChanging environments and genetic variation: natural variation in inbreeding does not compromise short-term physiological responses.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31744436en
plymouth.issue1915en
plymouth.volume286en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalProc Biol Scien
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2019.2109en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA06 Agriculture, Veterinary and Food Science
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA06 Agriculture, Veterinary and Food Science/UoA06 Agriculture, Veterinary and Food Science MANUAL
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2954en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rspb.2019.2109en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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