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dc.contributor.authorVerberk, WCEP
dc.contributor.authorCalosi, P
dc.contributor.authorBrischoux, F
dc.contributor.authorSpicer, J
dc.contributor.authorGarland, TJ
dc.contributor.authorBilton, D
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-12T15:21:42Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-27
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.issn1471-2954
dc.identifier.otherARTN 20200488
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15671
dc.descriptionNo embargo required
dc.description.abstract

<jats:p>Diving as a lifestyle has evolved on multiple occasions when air-breathing terrestrial animals invaded the aquatic realm, and diving performance shapes the ecology and behaviour of all air-breathing aquatic taxa, from small insects to great whales. Using the largest dataset yet assembled, we show that maximum dive duration increases predictably with body mass in both ectotherms and endotherms. Compared to endotherms, ectotherms can remain submerged for longer, but the mass scaling relationship for dive duration is much steeper in endotherms than in ectotherms. These differences in diving allometry can be fully explained by inherent differences between the two groups in their metabolic rate and how metabolism scales with body mass and temperature. Therefore, we suggest that similar constraints on oxygen storage and usage have shaped the evolutionary ecology of diving in all air-breathing animals, irrespective of their evolutionary history and metabolic mode. The steeper scaling relationship between body mass and dive duration in endotherms not only helps explain why the largest extant vertebrate divers are endothermic rather than ectothermic, but also fits well with the emerging consensus that large extinct tetrapod divers (e.g. plesiosaurs, ichthyosaurs and mosasaurs) were endothermic.</jats:p>

dc.format.extent20200488-20200488
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoyal Society, The
dc.subjectallometry
dc.subjectectothermy
dc.subjectendothermy
dc.subjectevolutionary physiology
dc.subjectpalaeophysiology
dc.subjectscaling
dc.titleUniversal metabolic constraints shape the evolutionary ecology of diving in animals
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32453989
plymouth.issue1927
plymouth.volume287
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2020.0488
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-04-27
dc.rights.embargodate2020-5-29
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2954
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rspb.2020.0488
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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