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dc.contributor.authorHaddoud, M
dc.contributor.authorOnjewu, A
dc.contributor.authorNowinski, W
dc.contributor.authorAlammari, K
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-09T11:58:08Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-05
dc.identifier.issn0307-5079
dc.identifier.issn1470-174X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15554
dc.description.abstract

Notwithstanding the volume of literature assessing the link between entrepreneurship education and individuals’ entrepreneurial behaviour, the mechanism underlying this relationship remains misunderstood. In fact, a combination of inconclusive findings and a narrow focus on western contexts duly compel further research in this area. In the current study, we argue that individuals’ emotions could be the missing link to explain contrasting findings and uncover how education affects entrepreneurial activity. To test our argument, we investigate a sample of 1314 Nigerian students from five universities across the country. We find that entrepreneurship education enhances entrepreneurial intention by regulating students’ emotions. However, not all emotions bridge this link. Our findings hold important implications for practice. Policy makers and entrepreneurship educators can draw on these findings to tailor their initiatives and programmes so that the relevant emotions are regulated and entrepreneurship activity is enhanced.

dc.format.extent450-468
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)
dc.subjectEntrepreneurship education
dc.subjectentrepreneurial intention
dc.subjectemotions
dc.subjectNigeria
dc.titleAssessing the role of entrepreneurship education in regulating emotions and fostering implementation intentions: Evidence from Nigerian Universities
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.webofscience.com/api/gateway?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000532369500001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=11bb513d99f797142bcfeffcc58ea008
plymouth.issue2
plymouth.volume47
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2020.1758652
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalStudies in Higher Education
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03075079.2020.1758652
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA17 Business and Management Studies
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-04-08
dc.rights.embargodate2021-11-5
dc.identifier.eissn1470-174X
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/03075079.2020.1758652
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-05-05
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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