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dc.contributor.authorHermens, Fen
dc.contributor.authorGolubickis, Men
dc.contributor.authorMacrae, CNen
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-07T11:37:13Z
dc.date.available2020-04-07T11:37:13Z
dc.date.issued2018en
dc.identifier.issn2167-8359en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15534
dc.description.abstract

Past studies examining how people judge faces for trustworthiness and dominance have suggested that they use particular facial features (e.g. mouth features for trustworthiness, eyebrow and cheek features for dominance ratings) to complete the task. Here, we examine whether eye movements during the task reflect the importance of these features. We here compared eye movements for trustworthiness and dominance ratings of face images under three stimulus configurations: Small images (mimicking large viewing distances), large images (mimicking face to face viewing), and a moving window condition (removing extrafoveal information). Whereas first area fixated, dwell times, and number of fixations depended on the size of the stimuli and the availability of extrafoveal vision, and varied substantially across participants, no clear task differences were found. These results indicate that gaze patterns for face stimuli are highly individual, do not vary between trustworthiness and dominance ratings, but are influenced by the size of the stimuli and the availability of extrafoveal vision.

en
dc.format.extente5702 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectEye movementsen
dc.subjectFace perceptionen
dc.subjectSocial judgmentsen
dc.titleEye movements while judging faces for trustworthiness and dominance.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30324015en
plymouth.volume6en
plymouth.publication-statusPublished onlineen
plymouth.journalPeerJen
dc.identifier.doi10.7717/peerj.5702en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience MANUAL
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-09-06en
dc.rights.embargodate9999-12-31en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.7717/peerj.5702en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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