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dc.contributor.authorGolubickis, M
dc.contributor.authorHo, NSP
dc.contributor.authorFalbén, JK
dc.contributor.authorMackenzie, KM
dc.contributor.authorBoschetti, A
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, WA
dc.contributor.authorNeil Macrae, C
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-07T10:35:18Z
dc.date.available2020-04-07T10:35:18Z
dc.date.issued2019-06
dc.identifier.issn2193-8652
dc.identifier.issn2193-8660
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15521
dc.description.abstract

In exploring self-biases in cognition and decision-making, recent research has demonstrated cultural variation in the emergence of the self-ownership effect in memory. Whereas Westerners display enhanced memory for items owned by the self (vs. mother), this effect is reversed among Asian participants. Developing this line of inquiry, here we considered whether cultural influences on ownership extend to other outcomes—specifically, the efficiency of object categorization. In two experiments, Western and Asian participants were required to report if previously assigned items (i.e., pencils and pens) were owned-by-self or owned-by-mother. Results revealed a self-prioritization effect for participants from both cultures, such that responses were faster to self-owned than mother-owned objects. To establish the origin of this effect, the processes underlying task performance were interrogated using a hierarchical drift diffusion model approach. Results of these analyses revealed that the self-ownership effect was underpinned primarily by a pre-decisional bias (i.e., starting point of evidence accumulation). These findings elucidate the extent and origin of the self-ownership effect during object processing.

dc.format.extent1-25
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subject5202 Biological Psychology
dc.subject5204 Cognitive and Computational Psychology
dc.subject52 Psychology
dc.subject5201 Applied and Developmental Psychology
dc.subjectClinical Research
dc.subjectMental health
dc.titleMine or mother’s? Exploring the self-ownership effect across cultures
dc.typejournal-article
plymouth.issue1
plymouth.volume7
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40167-018-0068-0
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalCulture and Brain
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40167-018-0068-0
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience MANUAL
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-06-23
dc.identifier.eissn2193-8660
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s40167-018-0068-0
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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