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dc.contributor.authorGu, Y
dc.contributor.authorHu, Y
dc.contributor.authorZhang, H
dc.contributor.authorFu, W
dc.contributor.authorYang, Y
dc.contributor.authorLatour, J
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-14T09:55:48Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-11
dc.identifier.issn1529-7535
dc.identifier.issn1947-3893
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15250
dc.description.abstract

<jats:sec> <jats:title>Objectives:</jats:title> <jats:p>To describe the implementation process of a nutrition risk screening and assessment guideline for infants with congenital heart disease and to assess the impact of nurses’ behavior and the effect on infants’ outcomes.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Design:</jats:title> <jats:p>A controlled before-and-after implementation study. The three dimensions of the integrated-Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework were used to assess barriers and promoting factors.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Setting:</jats:title> <jats:p>Cardiac center at Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Patients:</jats:title> <jats:p>Infants with congenital heart disease (<jats:italic toggle="yes">n</jats:italic> = 142) and nurses (<jats:italic toggle="yes">n</jats:italic> = 100).</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Interventions:</jats:title> <jats:p>Implementation of an evidenced-based nutrition risk screening and assessment guideline.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Measurements and Main Results:</jats:title> <jats:p>Implementation processes were assessed on nurses’ knowledge, attitude, behavior, and compliance of the guideline. Infants’ clinical outcomes were evaluated before-and-after the implementation. Knowledge, attitude, and behavior of nurses about nutrition risk screening and assessment increased significantly after implementing the guideline. Nurses’ compliance with the recommendations for nutritional risk screening improved significantly on three criteria; assessment of nutritional status stability (<jats:italic toggle="yes">p</jats:italic> &lt; 0.001), assessment of nutritional status deterioration (<jats:italic toggle="yes">p</jats:italic> = 0.003), and nutritional assessment among infants with moderate risk and above (<jats:italic toggle="yes">p</jats:italic> &lt; 0.001). The nurses’ compliance with the recommendations for nutrition assessment improved significantly in eight of the 10 criteria (<jats:italic toggle="yes">p</jats:italic> &lt; 0.001). The proportion of infants receiving comprehensive nutrition assessment when they were first screened with moderate or high nutritional risk were higher in the intervention group (24.3% vs 83.3%; <jats:italic toggle="yes">p</jats:italic> &lt; 0.001). The accuracy rates of nutrition risk screening were higher in the intervention group (52.9% vs 81.9%; <jats:italic toggle="yes">p</jats:italic> &lt; 0.001).</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusions:</jats:title> <jats:p>Using the integrated-Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework contributed to a successful implementation of the nutrition guideline. The nurses’ knowledge, attitude, and behavior toward the nutrition guideline were positive resulting in a significantly higher nutrition assessments in infants with moderate or high nutritional risk.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

dc.format.extente369-e377
dc.format.mediumPrint
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins
dc.subjectcongenital heart disease
dc.subjectguideline
dc.subjectimplementation science
dc.subjectinfant
dc.subjectnurses
dc.subjectnutrition
dc.titleImplementation of an evidence-based guideline of enteral nutrition for infants with congenital heart disease: a controlled before-and-after study
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32343107
plymouth.issue6
plymouth.volume21
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/pcc.0000000000002296
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/PCC.0000000000002296
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Nursing and Midwifery
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Plymouth Institute of Health and Care Research (PIHR)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-12-03
dc.rights.embargodate2021-3-11
dc.identifier.eissn1947-3893
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1097/PCC.0000000000002296
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-03-11
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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