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dc.contributor.authorDing, X
dc.contributor.authorWang, L
dc.contributor.authorSun, J
dc.contributor.authorLi, D-Y
dc.contributor.authorZheng, B-Y
dc.contributor.authorHe, S-W
dc.contributor.authorZhu, L-H
dc.contributor.authorLatour, J
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-30T10:59:11Z
dc.date.issued2020-02
dc.identifier.issn0260-6917
dc.identifier.issn1532-2793
dc.identifier.other104260
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15090
dc.description.abstract

BACKGROUND: Empathy is a central competence for nursing students in delivering compassionate care. Empathy training might improve the communication skills in children's nursing students. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Knowledge, Simulation, and Sharing training programme on empathy skills among children's nursing students. DESIGN: A controlled pre-post intervention study with a quasi-experimental design. SETTING: Tertiary children's hospital in China. PARTICIPANTS: Children's nursing students (n = 250) in clinical internship. METHODS: A Knowledge, Simulation, and Sharing (KSS) module related to empathy learning was developed and tested during a 10-month period in 2017. Nursing students were divided into an experimental group (n = 125) and control group (n = 125). Both groups received the standard internship programme. The experimental group received the KSS training. Outcome measures were: Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Professions Student, Clinical Communication Competence Scale and Professional Identity Scale. RESULTS: At the end of the internship the experimental groups had significantly higher empathy scores than the control group (114.57 versus 110.36; p = .016). The communication skills improved significantly in the experimental group after the training; experimental group mean 90.22 versus control group mean 87.41 (p = .042). The professional identity scores were significantly higher in the experimental group at the end of the internship compared to the control group (mean 116.43 versus 107.68; p < .001). Subgroup analysis revealed only significant differences on professional identity outcomes between experimental and control groups on diploma level (mean 115.78 versus 107.72; p < .001); and bachelor's level (mean 120.05 versus 108.00; p < .016). CONCLUSION: The KSS training can enhance empathy and communication skills and the professional identity in children's nursing students. Further long-term effectiveness of the training needs to be tested, ideally with reported outcomes measures of children and parents.

dc.format.extent104260-104260
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.subjectEmpathy
dc.subjectPaediatric nursing
dc.subjectNurses
dc.subjectStudents
dc.subjectCommunication
dc.subjectKnowledge
dc.subjectSimulation training
dc.subjectEducation
dc.titleEffectiveness of empathy clinical education for children’s nursing students: A quasi-experimental study
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31778862
plymouth.volume85
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2019.104260
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalNurse Education Today
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nedt.2019.104260
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Nursing and Midwifery
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Plymouth Institute of Health and Care Research (PIHR)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeScotland
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-10-29
dc.rights.embargodate2020-11-5
dc.identifier.eissn1532-2793
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.nedt.2019.104260
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-02
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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