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dc.contributor.authorGrose, Jen
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-11T14:52:18Z
dc.date.available2013-06-11T14:52:18Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-18en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/1505
dc.description.abstract

Objectives:In an effort to reduce costs and respond to climate change, health care providers (Trusts) in England have started to change how they purchase goods and services. Many factors, both internal and external, affect the supply chain. Our aim was to identify those factors, so as to maintain future supply and business continuity in health and social care.Methods:Qualitative interviews with 20 senior managers from private and public sector health service providers and social care providers in south west England. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed.Results:There were four areas of concern: contradictions with government legislation which caused confusion about how best to deliver sustainable solutions; procurement was unclear and created multiple approaches to purchasing bulk items at low cost; internal organizational systems needed to be reconsidered to embed sustainability; and embedding sustainability requires a review of organizational systems. There are examples of sustainability solutions throughout the National Health Service (NHS) but the response continues to be patchy. More research is needed into why some Trusts and some staff do not recognize the benefits of a core approach or find the systems unable to respond.Conclusions:The NHS is one of the major purchasers of goods and services in England and is therefore in an excellent position to encourage sustainable resource management, manufacturing, use and disposal.

en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.titleManaging a sustainable, low carbon supply chain in the English National Health Service: The views of senior managers.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23599047en
plymouth.publication-statusPublished onlineen
plymouth.journalJ Health Serv Res Policyen
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1355819612473453en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business/School of Law, Criminology and Government
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Nursing and Midwifery
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Professional Services staff
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dc.identifier.eissn1758-1060en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/1355819612473453en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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