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dc.contributor.authorKörding, KPen
dc.contributor.authorFukunaga, Ien
dc.contributor.authorHoward, ISen
dc.contributor.authorIngram, JNen
dc.contributor.authorWolpert, DMen
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-22T12:45:13Z
dc.date.available2019-10-22T12:45:13Z
dc.date.issued2004-10en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15034
dc.description.abstract

Making choices is a fundamental aspect of human life. For over a century experimental economists have characterized the decisions people make based on the concept of a utility function. This function increases with increasing desirability of the outcome, and people are assumed to make decisions so as to maximize utility. When utility depends on several variables, indifference curves arise that represent outcomes with identical utility that are therefore equally desirable. Whereas in economics utility is studied in terms of goods and services, the sensorimotor system may also have utility functions defining the desirability of various outcomes. Here, we investigate the indifference curves when subjects experience forces of varying magnitude and duration. Using a two-alternative forced-choice paradigm, in which subjects chose between different magnitude-duration profiles, we inferred the indifference curves and the utility function. Such a utility function defines, for example, whether subjects prefer to lift a 4-kg weight for 30 s or a 1-kg weight for a minute. The measured utility function depends nonlinearly on the force magnitude and duration and was remarkably conserved across subjects. This suggests that the utility function, a central concept in economics, may be applicable to the study of sensorimotor control.

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dc.format.extente330 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectBehavioren
dc.subjectBrainen
dc.subjectChoice Behavioren
dc.subjectCognitionen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectModels, Neurologicalen
dc.subjectModels, Statisticalen
dc.subjectModels, Theoreticalen
dc.titleA neuroeconomics approach to inferring utility functions in sensorimotor control.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15383835en
plymouth.issue10en
plymouth.volume2en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalPLoS Biolen
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pbio.0020330en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA11 Computer Science and Informatics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen
dcterms.dateAccepted2004-07-30en
dc.identifier.eissn1545-7885en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pbio.0020330en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2004-10en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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