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dc.contributor.authorRech, MFen
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-22T11:02:59Z
dc.date.available2019-10-22T11:02:59Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-19en
dc.identifier.issn1465-0045en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15008
dc.description.abstract

This paper explores contemporary cultures of British military recruitment and considers the domestication of geopolitics as matters of the ephemeral (fleeting, sensory encounters), and of ephemera (everyday objects). It employs an auto/ethnographic approach toward spaces critical to recruitment–the airshow, the home and the body. Three central contributions are developed: first, building on a recent turn to the material in political geography, the paper argues that taking seriously materiality, objects, and ‘stuff’ enhances our understanding of the connections between geopolitical, militarised and everyday; second, deploying a notion of the geopolitical social, it explores the geopolitical as it is situated in everyday lives and spaces; third, it investigates the tendency for militarised objects to find their way onto and around bodies and into domestic spaces. Set at the interface of literatures in critical geopolitics and critical military studies, the paper concludes that material encounters and everyday objects are matters central to the business of geopolitics and militarism.

en
dc.format.extent1075 - 1098en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.titleEphemera(l) Geopolitics: The Material Cultures of British Military Recruitmenten
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue5en
plymouth.volume25en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalGeopoliticsen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14650045.2019.1570920en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA14 Geography and Environmental Studies
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Research in Environment and Society (CeRES)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Research in Environment and Society (CeRES)/CeRES (Reporting)
dc.identifier.eissn1557-3028en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/14650045.2019.1570920en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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