Show simple item record

dc.contributor.supervisorMike, Phillips
dc.contributor.authorAga, Birgitte
dc.contributor.otherFaculty of Arts and Humanitiesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-31T12:38:11Z
dc.date.available2019-07-31T12:38:11Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier703332en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/14730
dc.description.abstract

This practice-based research inquiry explores the implications of conversational Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems, ‘relational things that talk’, on the way people experience the world. It responds directly to the pervasive lack of ethical design frameworks for commercial AI systems, compounded by limited transparency, ubiquitous authority, embedded bias and the absence of diversity in the development process.

The effect produced by relational things that talk upon the feelings, thoughts or intentions of the user is here defined as the ‘perlocutionary effect’ of conversational AI systems. This effect is constituted by these systems’ ‘relationality‘ and ‘persuasiveness’, propagated by the system’s embedded bias and ‘hybrid intentions’, relative to a user’s susceptibility.

The proposition of the perlocutionary effect frames the central practice of this thesis and the contribution to new knowledge which manifests as four discursive prototypes developed through a participatory method. Each prototype demonstrates the factors that constitute and propagate the perlocutionary effect. These prototypes also function as instruments which actively engage participants in a counter-narrative as a form of activism. ‘This Is Where We Are’ (TIWWA), explores the persuasiveness and relationality of relational things powered through AI behavioural algorithms and directed by pools of user data. ‘Emoti-OS’, iterates the findings from TIWWA and analyses the construction of relationality through simulated affect, personality and collective (artificial) emotional intelligence. ‘Women Reclaiming AI’ (WRAI), demonstrates stereotyping and bias in commercial conversational AI developments. The last prototype, ‘The Infinite Guide’, synthesises and tests the findings from the three previous prototypes to substantiate the overall perlocutionary effect of conversational AI system. In so doing, this inquiry proposes the appropriation of relational things that talk as a discursive design strategy, extended with a participatory method, for new forms of cultural expression and social action, which activate people to demand more ethical AI systems.

en_US
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Plymouth
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectArtificial Intelligenceen_US
dc.subjectConversational AIen_US
dc.subjectConversational Systemsen_US
dc.subjectChatbotsen_US
dc.subjectDiscursive Designen_US
dc.subject.classificationPhDen_US
dc.titlePROTOTYPING RELATIONAL THINGS THAT TALK: A DISCURSIVE DESIGN STRATEGY FOR CONVERSATIONAL AI SYSTEMSen_US
dc.typeThesis
plymouth.versionpublishableen_US
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargoen_US
dc.type.qualificationDoctorateen_US
rioxxterms.versionNA
plymouth.orcid_idhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-6063-8781en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

CC0 1.0 Universal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC0 1.0 Universal

All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
@mire NV