Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Men
dc.contributor.authorPerkins, DEen
dc.contributor.authorMerdian, HLen
dc.contributor.authorTyrrell, Een
dc.contributor.authorBabchishin, KMen
dc.contributor.authorMcCartan, KFen
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Ren
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-19T13:13:08Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-21en
dc.identifier.citation

Brennan, M. et al. (2019) Best Practice in the Management of Online Sex Offending PEARL Research Repository https://doi.org/10.24382/t2cs-sw55

dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/14331
dc.description.abstract

Our report sets out the outcomes from reviews of the relevant literature, and a series of consultations held by IWG_OSO, with participation from practitioners and researchers working in the field of child protection and online sex offending.

Online sex offending.

Internationally, researchers and practitioners have documented rises in the scale and impact of online sex offending, including the grooming of minors and vulnerable people for sexual purposes, sexual trafficking, and most dramatically, child sexual exploitation material and the related offences of its possession, production and distribution. Such a ‘high volume crime’ outweighs the capacity for effective management and prevention through the strategies and resources currently being used. This makes prosecution and case management increasingly difficult.

Challenges to good practice.

Without empirically based good practice, professionals are unable to deal effectively with the prevention of online sex offending, risk-management, and treatment decisions. This creates major limitations for the police, courts, probation, child protection, and other services, which are working to protect and safeguard children from online child sexual offenders, and to manage and prevent offending behaviours.

Current issues and possible solutions.

A series of current issues were highlighted, with possible solutions offered by IWG_OSO stakeholders. These included suggestions for changes in: international policy on CSEM offending; working with the internet industry; policing issues; research concerns; risk assessment and treatment developments; inter-agency and multi-disciplinary collaboration; barriers to change; and preventative methods.

Conclusions.

An increase in arresting and prosecuting offenders; An increase in earlier interventions and primary and secondary prevention; An increase in research to aid risk assessments, treatment options and prevention approaches; An increase in international collaboration and consistency in applying learning to policy and practice.

About the IWG_OSO.

The International Working Group for the Prevention of Online Sex Offending (IWG_OSO) was established as a response to the problem of online sexual offending and, in particular, offending involving Child Sexual Exploitation Material (CSEM). IWG_OSO’s initiation was enabled through the patronage of the International Association for the Treatment of Sexual Offenders (IATSO) in 2014 by a group of practitioners and researchers working in the field of online child sexual abuse and exploitation offending. We look to develop a framework for better offence management and prevention, with our stakeholders including those who work in law enforcement (e.g. INTERPOL and the UK National Crime Agency), the online industry, child protection, and in offender management and treatment services.

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleBest Practice in the Management of Online Sex Offendingen
dc.typeReport
plymouth.confidentialfalseen
dc.identifier.doi10.24382/t2cs-sw55en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health: Medicine, Dentistry and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health: Medicine, Dentistry and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
dc.rights.embargodate2019-06-21en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.24382/t2cs-sw55en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.typeTechnical Reporten


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International

All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
@mire NV