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dc.contributor.authorBeynon, CMen
dc.contributor.authorLuxton, Aen
dc.contributor.authorWhitaker, Ren
dc.contributor.authorCable, NTen
dc.contributor.authorFrith, Len
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, AHen
dc.contributor.authorZou, Len
dc.contributor.authorAngell, Pen
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Sen
dc.contributor.authorHolland, Den
dc.contributor.authorHolland, Sen
dc.contributor.authorGabbay, Men
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-07T15:00:13Z
dc.date.available2019-05-07T15:00:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-28en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/13780
dc.description.abstract

OBJECTIVES: To test whether older drug users (aged 40 and over) could be recruited to an exercise referral (ER) scheme, to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability and measure the impact of participation on health. DESIGN: Observational pilot. SETTING: Liverpool, UK. PARTICIPANTS: (1) 12 men and 5 women recruited to ER. (2) 7 specialist gym instructors. OUTCOME MEASURES: Logistic feasibility and acceptability of ER and associated research, rate of recruitment, level of participation over 8 weeks and changes in health. RESULTS: 22 gym inductions were arranged (recruitment time: 5 weeks), 17 inductions were completed and 14 participants began exercising. Attendance at the gym fluctuated with people missing weeks then re-engaging; in week 8, seven participants were in contact with the project and five of these attended the gym. Illness and caring responsibilities affected participation. Participants and gym instructors found the intervention and associated research processes acceptable. In general, participants enjoyed exercising and felt fitter, but would have welcomed more support and the offer of a wider range of activities. Non-significant reductions in blood pressure and heart rate and improvements in metabolic equivalents (METs; a measure of fitness) and general well-being were observed for eight participants who completed baseline and follow-up assessments. The number of weeks of gym attendance was significantly associated with a positive change in METs. CONCLUSIONS: It is feasible to recruit older drug users into a gym-based ER scheme, but multiple health and social challenges affect their ability to participate regularly. The observed changes in health measures, particularly the association between improvements in METs and attendance, suggest further investigation of ER for older drug users is worthwhile. Measures to improve the intervention and its evaluation include: better screening, refined inclusion/exclusion criteria, broader monitoring of physical activity levels, closer tailored support, more flexible exercise options and the use of incentives.

en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectHealth services administration & managementen
dc.subjectMental healthen
dc.subjectPublic healthen
dc.titleExercise referral for drug users aged 40 and over: results of a pilot study in the UK.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23793695en
plymouth.issue5en
plymouth.volume3en
plymouth.publication-statusPublished onlineen
plymouth.journalBMJ Openen
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2013-002619en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/Peninsula Medical School
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/FoH - Community and Primary Care
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine (ITSMED)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine (ITSMED)/CCT&PS
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Plymouth Institute of Health and Care Research (PIHR)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Researchers in ResearchFish submission
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dc.identifier.eissn2044-6055en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1136/bmjopen-2013-002619en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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