Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTorre, Ien
dc.contributor.authorGoslin, Jen
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Len
dc.contributor.authorZanatto, Den
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-05T14:28:05Z
dc.date.available2019-04-05T14:28:05Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-05en
dc.identifier.isbn9781450354202en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/13670
dc.description.abstract

© 2018 Copyright held by the owner/author(s). Societies rely on trustworthy communication in order to function, and the need for trust clearly extends to human-machine communication. Therefore, it is essential to design machines to elicit trust, so as to make interactions with them acceptable and successful. However, while there is a substantial literature on first impressions of trustworthiness based on various characteristics, including voice, not much is known about the trust development process. Are first impressions maintained over time? Or are they influenced by the experience of an agent's behaviour? We addressed these questions in three experiments using the "iterated investment game", a methodology derived from game theory that allows implicit measures of trust to be collected over time. Participants played the game with various agents having different voices: in the first experiment, participants played with a computer agent that had either a Standard Southern British English accent or a Liverpool accent; in the second experiment, they played with a computer agent that had either an SSBE or a Birmingham accent; in the third experiment, they played with a robot that had either a natural or a synthetic voice. All these agents behaved either trustworthily or untrustworthily. In all three experiments, participants trusted the agent with one voice more when it was trustworthy, and the agent with the other voice more when it was untrustworthy. This suggests that participants might change their trusting behaviour based on the congruency of the agent's behaviour with the participant's first impression. Implications for human-machine interaction design are discussed.

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleTrust in artificial voices: A "congruency effect" of first impressions and behavioural experienceen
dc.typeConference Contribution
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalACM International Conference Proceeding Seriesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1145/3183654.3183691en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Professional Services staff
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health: Medicine, Dentistry and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health: Medicine, Dentistry and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience/UoA4 REF peer reviewers
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Brain
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1145/3183654.3183691en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeConference Paper/Proceeding/Abstracten


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
@mire NV