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dc.contributor.authorCrone, A
dc.contributor.authorCavers, G
dc.contributor.authorAllison, E
dc.contributor.authorDavies, K
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, D
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, A
dc.contributor.authorMackay, H
dc.contributor.authorMcLaren, D
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, J
dc.contributor.authorRoy, L
dc.contributor.authorWhitehouse, NJ
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-12T21:27:37Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-26
dc.identifier.issn2051-6231
dc.identifier.issn2051-6231
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/13456
dc.description.abstract

Excavations at Black Loch of Myrton, Dumfries & Galloway are revealing the very well-preserved remains of an Iron Age settlement, the wetland context ensuring that the timber structures have remained intact and that the detritus of daily occupation survives for us to pick apart and understand. One of the structures in this settlement is an exceptionally well-preserved roundhouse, the material remains of which have been subjected to a barrage of analyses encompassing the insect, macroplant, bone and wood assemblages, soil micromorphology, faecal steroids, radiocarbon-dating and dendrochronology. These will enable us to address some of the key issues regarding the life cycles of Iron Age roundhouses, from conception and construction, use of internal space, nature of occupation and likely function, through to abandonment. Critically, we are now able to view that life cycle through the lens of a tightly-defined chronology bringing us close to the ‘ … short-term timescales of lived reality’ [Foxhall, L. 2000. “The Running Sands of Time: Archaeology and the Short-Term.” World Archaeology 31 (3): 484–498].

dc.format.extent138-162
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.subject4301 Archaeology
dc.subject4303 Historical Studies
dc.subject43 History, Heritage and Archaeology
dc.titleNasty, Brutish and Short? The life cycle of an Iron Age round house at Black Loch of Myrton, SW Scotland.
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue1
plymouth.volume18
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14732971.2019.1576413
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalJournal of Wetland Archaeology
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14732971.2019.1576413
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA14 Geography and Environmental Studies
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-01-23
dc.rights.embargodate2019-3-15
dc.identifier.eissn2051-6231
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/14732971.2019.1576413
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-02-26
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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