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dc.contributor.authorHarvey, BPen
dc.contributor.authorAgostini, Sen
dc.contributor.authorWada, Sen
dc.contributor.authorInaba, Ken
dc.contributor.authorHall-Spencer, JMen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-21T10:06:41Z
dc.date.available2019-01-21T10:06:41Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-12en
dc.identifier.issn2296-7745en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/13173
dc.description.abstract

© 2018 Harvey, Agostini, Wada, Inaba and Hall-Spencer. Ocean acidification is expected to negatively impact many calcifying marine organisms by impairing their ability to build their protective shells and skeletons, and by causing dissolution and erosion. Here we investigated the large predatory "triton shell" gastropod Charonia lampas in acidified conditions near CO2 seeps off Shikine-jima (Japan) and compared them with individuals from an adjacent bay with seawater pH at present-day levels (outside the influence of the CO2 seep). By using computed tomography we show that acidification negatively impacts their thickness, density, and shell structure, causing visible deterioration to the shell surface. Periods of aragonite undersaturation caused the loss of the apex region and exposing body tissues. While gross calcification rates were likely reduced near CO2 seeps, the corrosive effects of acidification were far more pronounced around the oldest parts of the shell. As a result, the capacity of C. lampas to maintain their shells under ocean acidification may be strongly driven by abiotic dissolution and erosion, and not under biological control of the calcification process. Understanding the response of marine calcifying organisms and their ability to build and maintain their protective shells and skeletons will be important for our understanding of future marine ecosystems.

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen
dc.titleDissolution: The achilles' heel of the triton shell in an acidifying oceanen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issueOCTen
plymouth.volume5en
plymouth.journalFrontiers in Marine Scienceen
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmars.2018.00371en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/PRIMaRE Publications
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-09-25en
dc.rights.embargodate2019-12-18en
dc.identifier.eissn2296-7745en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3389/fmars.2018.00371en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-10-12en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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