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dc.contributor.authorBach, Pen
dc.contributor.authorAllami, BKen
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Men
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Ren
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-30T20:16:37Z
dc.date.available2018-10-30T20:16:37Z
dc.date.issued2014-06en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/12695
dc.description.abstract

It is still controversial whether mental practice-the internal rehearsal of movements to improve later performance-relies on processes engaged during physical motor performance and, if so, which processes these are. We report data from 5 experiments, in which participants mentally practiced complex rhythms with either feet or hands while using the same or different body parts to respond to unrelated sounds. We found that responses were impaired for those body parts that were concurrently used in mental practice, suggesting a binding of body-part-specific motor processes to action plans. This result was found when participants mentally trained to memorize the rhythms, to merely improve their performance, when mental practice and execution directly followed one another and when separated by a different task. Finally, it was found irrespective of whether participants practiced on the basis of a symbolic rhythm description and when they practiced by watching somebody perform the rhythms (imitation learning). The effect was eliminated only when the requirement for mental practice was eliminated from the task while keeping visual stimulation identical. These data link mental practice not to execution but planning related motor processes and reveal that these planning processes underlie both mental practice and imitation learning.

en
dc.format.extent1277 - 1294en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectExecutive Functionen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectImaginationen
dc.subjectImitative Behavioren
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMotor Activityen
dc.subjectPractice (Psychology)en
dc.subjectPsychomotor Performanceen
dc.subjectYoung Adulten
dc.titlePlanning-related motor processes underlie mental practice and imitation learning.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24548280en
plymouth.issue3en
plymouth.volume143en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalJ Exp Psychol Genen
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0035604en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Brain
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen
dc.identifier.eissn1939-2222en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1037/a0035604en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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