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dc.contributor.authorBach, P
dc.contributor.authorHudson, M
dc.contributor.authorMcDonough, KL
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, R
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-16T09:18:34Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-15
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.issn1471-2954
dc.identifier.other20180638
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11839
dc.descriptionNo embargo required.
dc.description.abstract

<jats:p>Primates interpret conspecific behaviour as goal-directed and expect others to achieve goals by the most efficient means possible. While this teleological stance is prominent in evolutionary and developmental theories of social cognition, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In predictive models of social cognition, a perceptual prediction of an ideal efficient trajectory would be generated from prior knowledge against which the observed action is evaluated, distorting the perception of unexpected inefficient actions. To test this, participants observed an actor reach for an object with a straight or arched trajectory on a touch screen. The actions were made efficient or inefficient by adding or removing an obstructing object. The action disappeared mid-trajectory and participants touched the last seen screen position of the hand. Judgements of inefficient actions were biased towards the efficient prediction (straight trajectories upward to avoid the obstruction, arched trajectories downward towards the target). These corrections increased when the obstruction's presence/absence was explicitly acknowledged, and when the efficient trajectory was explicitly predicted. Additional supplementary experiments demonstrated that these biases occur during ongoing visual perception and/or immediately after motion offset. The teleological stance is at least partly perceptual, providing an ideal reference trajectory against which actual behaviour is evaluated.</jats:p>

dc.format.extent0-0
dc.format.mediumElectronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoyal Society, The
dc.subjectrepresentational momentum
dc.subjectaction prediction
dc.subjectprediction errors
dc.subjectteleological reasoning
dc.subjectmotion perception
dc.subjectsocial perception
dc.titlePerceptual Teleology: Expectations of Action Efficiency Bias Social Perception
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30089623
plymouth.issue1884
plymouth.volume285
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2018.0638
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2018.0638
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Brain
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-07-12
dc.rights.embargodate2019-11-26
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2954
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rspb.2018.0638
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08-15
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
plymouth.funderOne step ahead: Prediction of other people's behavior in healthy and autistic individuals.::ESRC


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