Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorELLIS, JS
dc.contributor.authorSUMNER, KJ
dc.contributor.authorGRIFFITHS, AM
dc.contributor.authorBRIGHT, DI
dc.contributor.authorSTEVENS, JR
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-25T09:47:43Z
dc.date.available2018-05-25T09:47:43Z
dc.date.issued2011-06
dc.identifier.issn0969-997X
dc.identifier.issn1365-2400
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11596
dc.description.abstract

Population genetic studies can be useful for informing conservation and management. In Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., population structuring frequently occurs between river systems, but contrasting patterns occur within rivers, highlighting the need for catchment-specific studies to inform management. Here, population structure of Atlantic salmon was examined in the River Tamar, United Kingdom, using 12 microsatellite loci. Gene diversity and allelic richness ranged from 0.80 to 0.84 and from 8.96 to 10.24, respectively. Some evidence of genetic structure was found, including significant genetic differentiation between samples in different subcatchments (pairwise θ and tests of genic differentiation), results from assignment tests and a pattern of isolation by distance. Conversely, structure revealed only one population cluster, and an analysis of molecular variance showed no significant variation between subcatchments. Evidence of population bottlenecks depended on the mutation model assumed and is discussed with reference to catchment-specific studies of stock abundance. Implications for implementing management actions are considered. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

dc.format.extent233-245
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectassignment
dc.subjectconservation genetics
dc.subjectfisheries management
dc.subjectmicrosatellites
dc.subjectpopulation decline
dc.titlePopulation genetic structure of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., in the River Tamar, southwest England
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.webofscience.com/api/gateway?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000290173700006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=11bb513d99f797142bcfeffcc58ea008
plymouth.issue3
plymouth.volume18
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2400.2010.00776.x
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalFisheries Management and Ecology
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2400.2010.00776.x
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA06 Agriculture, Veterinary and Food Science
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2400
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargo
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/j.1365-2400.2010.00776.x
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
Atmire NV