Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWilson, ADMen
dc.contributor.authorKrause, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-09T10:40:12Z
dc.date.available2018-05-09T10:40:12Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-01en
dc.identifier.issn1045-2249en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11467
dc.description.abstract

Understanding the manner by which individual differences in personality arise and are maintained in animal populations is currently a topic of considerable research interest. This is particularly the case when it comes to developmental processes and understanding how behaviors change over ontogeny. Such developmental perspectives are essential given that the vast majority of animal species possess complex life cycles or undergo some form of metamorphosis. Yet, in spite of the broad taxonomic relevance and the obvious potential importance of metamorphosis for understanding the basis of consistency in personality over ontogeny, almost no research has been done on this topic. Using the lake frog (Rana ridibunda) as a study organism, we tested whether individual-level differences in personality (activity, exploration and boldness) were consistent within both larval and juvenile frog life-history stages and across metamorphosis. We found that most behaviors of interest were highly consistent within a given life-history stage and at least some traits were consistent across metamorphosis (e.g., activity and exploration). Generally, more active, exploratory individuals in novel experimental arenas were also bolder and more likely to spend time in more risky open areas of a familiar environment. To our knowledge, our study is the first to both characterize personality traits across anuran development and provide evidence of consistency in behavior across metamorphosis in a vertebrate species. © 2012 The Author.

en
dc.format.extent1316 - 1323en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titlePersonality and metamorphosis: Is behavioral variation consistent across ontogenetic niche shifts?en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue6en
plymouth.volume23en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalBehavioral Ecologyen
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/beheco/ars123en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.identifier.eissn1465-7279en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargoen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/beheco/ars123en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
@mire NV