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dc.contributor.authorWilson, ADMen
dc.contributor.authorGodin, JGJen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-09T10:30:24Z
dc.date.available2018-05-09T10:30:24Z
dc.date.issued2010-01-01en
dc.identifier.issn1045-2249en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11460
dc.description.abstract

Intermittent locomotion, characterized by moves interspersed with pauses, is a common pattern of locomotion in animals, but its ecological and evolutionary significance relative to continuous locomotion remains poorly understood. Although many studies have examined individual differences in both intermittent locomotion and boldness separately, to our knowledge, no study to date has investigated the relationship between these 2 traits. Characterizing and understanding this relationship is important, as both locomotion and boldness are associated with several ecologically relevant behaviors such as foraging, mating, predator evasion, exploration, and dispersal. Here, we report on individual differences in boldness (risk-taking behavior) and intermittent locomotion in a novel laboratory environment in field-caught juvenile bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Our results show that juvenile bluegill sunfish exhibited individual-level variation in 2 modes of intermittent locomotion (undulatory and labriform swimming) and that this variation was correlated with differences in their boldness behavior. Generally, bolder individuals spent more time moving fast for longer durations and with shorter pauses than more timid individuals. Neither boldness nor locomotion was correlated with body size or body condition. This study provides the first empirical evidence for a link between an animal "personality" trait and intermittent locomotion.

en
dc.format.extent57 - 62en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleBoldness and intermittent locomotion in the bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirusen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue1en
plymouth.volume21en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalBehavioral Ecologyen
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/beheco/arp157en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
dc.identifier.eissn1465-7279en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargoen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/beheco/arp157en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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