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dc.contributor.authorDomenici, Pen
dc.contributor.authorWilson, ADMen
dc.contributor.authorKurvers, RHJMen
dc.contributor.authorMarras, Sen
dc.contributor.authorHerbert-Read, JEen
dc.contributor.authorSteffensen, JFen
dc.contributor.authorKrause, Sen
dc.contributor.authorViblanc, PEen
dc.contributor.authorCouillaud, Pen
dc.contributor.authorKrause, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-09T10:23:01Z
dc.date.available2018-05-09T10:23:01Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-07en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11453
dc.description.abstract

The istiophorid family of billfishes is characterized by an extended rostrum or 'bill'. While various functions (e.g. foraging and hydrodynamic benefits) have been proposed for this structure, until now no study has directly investigated the mechanisms by which billfishes use their rostrum to feed on prey. Here, we present the first unequivocal evidence of how the bill is used by Atlantic sailfish (Istiophorus albicans) to attack schooling sardines in the open ocean. Using high-speed video-analysis, we show that (i) sailfish manage to insert their bill into sardine schools without eliciting an evasive response and (ii) subsequently use their bill to either tap on individual prey targets or to slash through the school with powerful lateral motions characterized by one of the highest accelerations ever recorded in an aquatic vertebrate. Our results demonstrate that the combination of stealth and rapid motion make the sailfish bill an extremely effective feeding adaptation for capturing schooling prey.

en
dc.format.extent20140444 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectanimal weaponsen
dc.subjectbillfishesen
dc.subjectfish schoolsen
dc.subjectpredator–prey interactionsen
dc.subjectAccelerationen
dc.subjectAdaptation, Biologicalen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectPerciformesen
dc.subjectPredatory Behavioren
dc.subjectVideotape Recordingen
dc.titleHow sailfish use their bills to capture schooling prey.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24759865en
plymouth.issue1784en
plymouth.volume281en
plymouth.publication-statusPublished onlineen
plymouth.journalProc Biol Scien
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2014.0444en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2954en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rspb.2014.0444en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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