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dc.contributor.authorWilson, ADMen
dc.contributor.authorWikelski, Men
dc.contributor.authorWilson, RPen
dc.contributor.authorCooke, SJen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-09T10:17:02Z
dc.date.issued2015-08en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11447
dc.description.abstract

Electronic tags (both biotelemetry and biologging platforms) have informed conservation and resource management policy and practice by providing vital information on the spatial ecology of animals and their environments. However, the extent of the contribution of biological sensors (within electronic tags) that measure an animal's state (e.g., heart rate, body temperature, and details of locomotion and energetics) is less clear. A literature review revealed that, despite a growing number of commercially available state sensor tags and enormous application potential for such devices in animal biology, there are relatively few examples of their application to conservation. Existing applications fell under 4 main themes: quantifying disturbance (e.g., ecotourism, vehicular and aircraft traffic), examining the effects of environmental change (e.g., climate change), understanding the consequences of habitat use and selection, and estimating energy expenditure. We also identified several other ways in which sensor tags could benefit conservation, such as determining the potential efficacy of management interventions. With increasing sensor diversity of commercially available platforms, less invasive attachment techniques, smaller device sizes, and more researchers embracing such technology, we suggest that biological sensor tags be considered a part of the necessary toolbox for conservation. This approach can measure (in real time) the state of free-ranging animals and thus provide managers with objective, timely, relevant, and accurate data to inform policy and decision making.

en
dc.format.extent1065 - 1075en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectbio-registroen
dc.subjectbio-telemetríaen
dc.subjectbiologgingen
dc.subjectbiotelemetryen
dc.subjectelectronic tagsen
dc.subjectetiquetas electrónicasen
dc.subjectAnimal Migrationen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectConservation of Natural Resourcesen
dc.subjectEcosystemen
dc.subjectMovementen
dc.subjectRemote Sensing Technologyen
dc.titleUtility of biological sensor tags in animal conservation.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25833384en
plymouth.issue4en
plymouth.volume29en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalConserv Biolen
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cobi.12486en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-12-23en
dc.identifier.eissn1523-1739en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargoen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/cobi.12486en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-08en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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