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dc.contributor.authorMoraga, ADen
dc.contributor.authorWilson, ADMen
dc.contributor.authorCooke, SJen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-09T09:23:22Z
dc.date.available2018-05-09T09:23:22Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-01en
dc.identifier.issn0165-7836en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11441
dc.description.abstract

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.. The contemporary tackle box for recreational angling is packed with lures that cover the full spectrum of colours with the assumption that colour influences fishing success. Yet, there is little research that identifies how lure colour might influence capture rates or size-selectivity. Moreover, while much is known about the factors that influence hooking injury or hooking depth (which is a good predictor of mortality in released fish), to our knowledge no studies have examined if such factors are influenced by lure colour in fishes. Here we tested the effects of lure colour on catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE), size-selectivity and hooking injury of largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, using artificial 12.7. cm un-scented soft-plastic worms. Lures comprising six colours in three colour categories (i.e., dark - bream 'blue', leech 'black'; natural - cigar 'red', wasp; bright - pearl 'white', sherbert 'orange'), which were individually fished for 20-min intervals multiple times per day. Data analysis revealed that CPUE was similar across individual colours and categories. However, bright colours appeared to selectively capture larger fish than either dark or natural lure colours. Lure colour did not influence length-corrected hooking depth or anatomical hooking location. Our study reveals that while different lure colours might capture the imagination and wallet of the angler, they do not influence CPUE or hooking injury in bass but appear to have a small influence on the size of captured fish.

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dc.format.extent1 - 6en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleDoes lure colour influence catch per unit effort, fish capture size and hooking injury in angled largemouth bass?en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.volume172en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalFisheries Researchen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.fishres.2015.06.010en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.fishres.2015.06.010en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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